Wednesday, April 13, 2016

What's That Smell?

Have you ever thought about why you were attracted to someone? Did you ever thing it is because of the smell that they secrete? These smells are known as pheromones. Most people and animals use them to communicate and attract one another. Scientists have tried to identify and bottle up human pheromones, but haven't been able to discover it. Scientists do have concrete evidence that pheromones do help you smell someone gender. They have also discovered that the smell of pheromones has been linked to attraction and fertility.


Studies have been conducted on both men and women. Men where asked to smell shirts of women that were close to ovulation. When they smelt these shirts they had increased testosterone levels, then when they smelt the placebos. Another study showed that when women smelt the smell of men's sweat they felt less tense and more relaxed than when they smelt the placebo. These studies are linking pheromones to sexual attraction and regulating mood.


Each person had a unique smell that give off. This is said to be because of the protein MHC, which regulated the immune system. Most people are likely to be attracted to someone who has a different immune system then your own. Researchers say that this would increase the immune system of offspring and the offspring would have a better chance of fighting off disease. Each person experiences smells differently and no two people have the same smell.

Sources:
http://time.com/3707071/pheromones-love-life/
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-truth-about-pheromones-100363955/

Caitlyn Cordaro (1)

4 comments:

  1. This is cool. It's funny because people can always say that they find certain things attractive. But on top of that, pheromones could also be playing a huge role.

    comment by Nick Michienzi

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  2. Definitely smells matter in attraction( taking about perfume and cologne). I didn't know that everyone has a unique smell and that it is dependent on MHC.

    Mohammed Saleh

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  4. This is not surprising for me especially when discussing animals. However, for humans this is interesting (when referring to their own biomedical processes) because we often purchase body fragrants to give us scent. I wonder if we eat particular food it changes our pheromones to smell differently.

    Donisha White

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