Thursday, April 6, 2017

Migraines vs. Anxiety

Migraines vs. Anxiety

Most people tend to experience migraines on a daily basis, but little do they realize that due to having these migraines, it can create a generalized anxiety. As a man who gets migraines on a weekly basis, I can completely understand how people connect migraines with generalized anxiety. I too have generalized anxiety, and it is not an easy thing to deal with. When I have a migraine, it feels like i have a knife stabbing into a portion of my head constantly, for hours on end. When this happens to me, it makes it impossible for me to do anything. Having the lights on makes the migraine feel worse, and even the softest of noises sounds like someone is yelling and makes it feel like someone is digging the knife into my head even deeper. When feeling that type of pain, it feels almost impossible to move, never mind trying to go to work, school, or trying to clean the house. Not being able to do these things, makes your head hurt more because you're stressing out over everything that is going to need to be done after the migraine finally goes away. Sometimes a migraine can even last days, which makes you feel really behind.

As I was reading an article on the connection between migraines and generalized anxiety, I had learned a lot of new information on this issue I tend to deal with on a weekly basis. University of Toronto did a research that shows that 6 percent of people with generalized anxiety also would get migraines verses the 2 percent of people who don't get migraines but still have generalized anxiety. What really surprised me was how the study discovered that men with migraines have twice the risk of having this anxiety than women with migraines. One of the co-author's, Senyo Agbeyaka, had explained that even though women have a larger chance to be diagnosed with generalized anxiety in the general population, it is because men are less likely than women to take medication to treat the migraine. This will cause the disorder to possibly become more painful and less controllable, which will eventually lead to anxiety.

In my case, I tend to stay as hydrated as possible to keep away my migraines at all costs. If that does not help, I would see a doctor and get treated, even if it means taking medicine. It is better off to take medicine to help the migraine than it is not to take medicine, because then it could cause the migraine to get worse, and eventually lead you into having anxiety.

Posted by: Givenchy Humes (B)

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170329122627.htm

Image: http://domesticity.gawker.com/household-tips-care-and-feeding-of-your-new-pet-migrai-1639199910

7 comments:

  1. I found the study very interesting that University of Toronto did to show more correlation between people with generalized anxiety having migraines verses 2 percent of people who just have the anxiety alone. It shows that this is potentially now a common side effect of migraines. Anxiety is also an overlooked symptom or illness, but little do people know it can have devastating effects on one's life leading to other illnesses without even knowing what's going on.

    Posted by Andrew Do (Group A)

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    1. Having a migraine all in itself is a problem to deal with but having its side effect be anxiety is like adding salt to the wound. But anxiety is truly an overlooked illness. Fortunately for me I only experience mild symptoms of both and not very often as do some people that I know. Thanks for the comment.

      Reply by: Givenchy Humes (B)

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  2. It is interesting that the University of Toronto found this connection, but it does make sense. As you mentioned, migraines are so much more than just a headache, and they can last days, meaning you're out of work or school. Just thinking about that makes me anxious. I also thought it was interesting that they found that men are less likely to take medication for their migraines than women. Besides staying hydrated, are there any other ways to prevent migraines?

    Posted by Jordan Milone (C)

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    1. You know Jordan I was wondering the same thing as to why women are more likely to take medication over men and I wondered if that was because of "pain tolerance" or just simply ego. But besides just staying hydrated caffeine is a great remedy for my migraines. I haven't done much research on it but caffeine is the best go to when dealing with headaches in itself. Thank you for your post.

      Reply by: Givenchy Humes (B)

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  3. I was just talking to some friends about this today about how terrible migraines are. I think this study is interesting and makes perfect sense that anxiety can trigger a migraine or just worsen one. I know friends who always get migraines around finals week or around the time of a huge assignment. I'm lucky to have never experienced one but I have seen people who have them and miss work because their vision is blurry, they're sensitive to light, they can't eat, or they vomit when they try to eat. I definitely think that anxiety plays a large role in having migraines.

    Posted by Ana Carolina Nepomuceno

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    1. I appreciate your comment. It is a difficult situation to handle especially when something as little as light can trigger a migraine. It's especially rough during finals week as you mentioned not to mention the anxiety that is already there. Thankfully I have ways of coping with the issue. Thank you again for your comment.

      Reply by: Givenchy Humes (B)

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  4. It is interesting to see the correlation between anxiety and migraines. I wonder if one causes the other, or if it is merely just a coincidence. It would be interesting to learn the biological mechanisms behind both migraines and anxiety and to see if there is any overlap. Many people suffer from generalized anxiety and do not get it diagnosed so I wonder if the cases of people with both migraines and anxiety is actually greater.

    Posted by Leah DeLorenzo

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